Conflict Management

Communication with High Conflict Personalities

Many years ago I attended a workshop conducted by Bill Eddy, co-founder and Chief Innovation Officer at the High Conflict Institute in California. Bill pioneered the High Conflict Personality Theory (HCP) and is considered an expert in managing disputes involving people with high conflict personalities.

I know that some readers will be thinking they have a few HCP employees at their current organisation.

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Negative Micro Behaviours Are A Sign Of Frustration And Poor Communication Skills

In a previous article, I explained which behaviours may constitute a negative micro behaviour and how the display of such behaviours should be best managed and addressed. In this article, I would like to explore with you why a staff member may display negative micro behaviours at work. All actions, all behaviours, whether overt or covert, whether […]

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Negative Micro Behaviours What Are They And How Can They Be Addressed?

In an HRM article (September 2021), a consulting workplace psychologist identified 8 negative micro behaviours which lead to interpersonal tensions and conflict.

These behaviours were identified as:

Interrupting others
Negative body language
Irritable or arrogant demeanour
Complaining and gossiping about others…

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Are Your Employees Fine? How To Properly Manage Conflict In The Workplace

Are Your Employees Fine

“I’m fine.” You may be fine but how you’re delivering that answer might give away more information than you think.

Have you asked an employee how they are and you receive a blunt response? Have they responded, “Fine” (in a deeper tone with slight, downward intonation)?

Engaging your emotional intelligence, you know they aren’t fine at all.

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The Role Of Generosity In Mediation

The Role of Genorisity In Mediation

At some point in a mediation, one person will ‘shift’ from presenting and defending their perspective to genuinely acknowledging the hurt, frustration, loss or other feeling of pain being expressed by the other.

To ‘move’ from a place of focusing only on one’s own opinions and perspectives, a place that has been a type of sanctuary for certainty and therefore comfort, requires one to lower their defenses and to step outside of their view of the past, which they may have held on to for so long as a being the truth.

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Why Managers Let Workplace Conflict Grow

Why Managers Let Workplace Conflict Grow

Managers play a crucial role in reducing interpersonal workplace conflict, but for a number of reasons they often don’t recognise when issues require intervention, a conflict resolution specialist says.

Conflict usually stems from one person’s interpretation of another’s behaviour, thinking and intentions, Workplace Conflict Resolution managing director Catherine Gillespie told HR Daily ahead of her upcoming webinar on managing personality conflicts at work.

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Getting to the Heart of Conflict

Getting to the heart of conflict WPCR

‘Getting to the heart of conflict’ is the name of a book written by Professor Bernie Mayer, Lecturer in Negotiation and Dispute Resolution at Creighton University. I recently attended a workshop presented by Bernie. He offered a mixture of self reflection and group sharing opportunities along with offering the insights he has gathered, tested, and reflected upon over 30+ years of working in these fields.

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Why I Was In Conflict With You

Why I am in conflict with you… I am in conflict with you because I don’t trust you. I don’t trust you because you have done and said things that contradict what I think is acceptable. Behaviours (actions and comments) that I find acceptable are ones which: - Show me respect - Support my efforts - Align with my values - Do not make me feel uncomfortable or confronted - Are displayed consistently and in a transparent manner - Leave no room for me to second guess your intentions I am less likely to be in conflict with you if we share some aspects of commonality or relatedness. The more we share in common and the more times I have a positive interaction with you, the less chance there is for conflict.

Why I am in conflict with you…

I am in conflict with you because I don’t trust you.

I don’t trust you because you have done and said things that contradict what I think is acceptable.

Behaviours (actions and comments) that I find acceptable are ones which:

Show me respect
Support my efforts
Align with my values
Do not make me feel uncomfortable or confronted

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